If you’ve experienced an injury on the job, applying for workers’ compensation benefits is crucial. This coverage may include partial repayment of lost wages. If your injury keeps you from working, there’s no reason for you to forego income during your recovery. By understanding how to calculate your lost wages, you can pursue the coverage you deserve.

Determining wage loss

When making a workers’ compensation claim, keep in mind that your benefits will only replace two-thirds of your lost wages. Yet, it’s crucial to calculate your wages correctly, so you don’t miss out on any potential coverage. You may receive compensation beyond your base wage, and it’s important to add these figures to your total wage. If you regularly worked overtime hours before your accident, you may be able to factor these in. Yet, you can only do so if you can prove you’ve worked consistent overtime shifts during your employment. If you’re tipped while working, these payments can count toward lost wages as well. And if you’ve received a bonus for individual job performance, you may be able to pro-rate it as part of your wages, too.

Potential challenges

Your claim may face complications if you lose your job while recovering. If you need to look for new employment, your benefits will continue to account for your lost income. The exception to this rule is if you do not make an active attempt to search for a new job. Your wage may also change during your recovery. In this case, your benefits would reflect your new wage, rather than your previous wage. And your claim could face denial from your employer’s insurance company, too. If it does, you can pursue mediation through Minnesota’s Department of Labor and Industry. You have the option to appeal your denial as well, so long as you do so within 60 days of its decision.

After injuring yourself on the job, it’s imperative that you have a means for survival. An attorney with workers’ compensation experience can help you take the necessary steps to protect yourself.